Fibroid Treatment | BPH Treatment

Fibroid Treatment in Kansas City, KS

Enjoy a Life without Fibroids

Cramping and disruptive symptoms such as heavy periods can make it difficult to go to work or participate in everyday activities. This causes you to reluctantly cancel plans with others because you are worried about having an embarrassing accident. If you are living with uterine fibroids, then you probably dread that time of the month and your frustration is not alone.

Many women in Kansas City and Overland Park suffer like this for years because they’ve been told invasive surgery is their only option. Women that don’t want to undergo surgery are often unaware there is a safe, non-surgical treatment alternative to myomectomy and hysterectomy.

At the department of Interventional Radiology at The Kansas University Medical Center, we specialize in uterine fibroid embolization (UFE). Our non-surgical approach for the treatment of fibroids can be performed in 90 minutes and allows you to return home the same day. The procedure is less invasive than a myomectomy or hysterectomy. To discuss your treatment options, call our fibroid treatment center in Kansas City or Overland Park at (913) 588-1030 or request an appointment online.

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Non-Invasive Treatments

DIAGNOSIS AND WATCHFUL WAITING

If your fibroids do not cause symptoms, there is no need to treat them. Your doctor may want to watch them and monitor for any fibroid growth at each of your annual gynecological (OB-GYN) examinations. Some women may have fibroids, but not experience symptoms that affect their daily life.

HORMONE TREATMENT

Medications for uterine fibroids target hormones that regulate your menstrual cycle, treating symptoms such as heavy menstrual bleeding and pelvic pressure. They don’t eliminate fibroids but may shrink them. The side effects of using these medications are similar to the symptoms experienced as a result of hormonal changes during and after menopause. These include weight gain, hot flashes, vaginal dryness, mood swings, changes in metabolism, and infertility. In almost all cases, once hormone therapy has been stopped, fibroids tend to grow back, possibly reaching their original size again. This often occurs if the use of hormone therapy is not accompanied by another treatment.

Less Invasive Treatment Options

ENDOMETRIAL ABLATION

A procedure called endometrial ablation destroys the endometrium – the lining of your uterus – with the goal of reducing your menstrual flow. In some women, menstrual flow may stop completely. No incisions are needed for endometrial ablation. Your doctor inserts slender tools through your cervix — the passageway between your vagina and your uterus. The tools vary, depending on the method used to destroy the endometrium. Some types of endometrial ablation use extreme cold, while other methods depend on heated fluids, microwave energy, or high-energy radio frequencies. Endometrial ablation can only be used to treat submucosal fibroids that are less than one inch in diameter.

Surgical Treatments

HYSTEROSCOPIC MYOMECTOMY

In this procedure, a long, thin scope with a light is passed through the vagina and cervix into the uterus. No incision is needed. A camera also can be used with the scope. Submucosal or intracavitary fibroids are easily visualized and can be resected or removed using a wire loop or similar device. Patients usually are sent home after the procedure. The hospital stay can last from 30 minutes to 2 hours and recovery time is generally 1-2 days. Generally, only fibroids that are small and accessible through the cavity can be treated this way.

UTERINE FIBROID EMBOLIZATION

Rather than make a surgical incision to the uterus, or even anywhere in the pelvis, our specialists are able to treat the patient’s fibroid(s) by threading a thin tube through a small cut in the groin or wrist. The tube, also called a catheter, is carefully maneuvered through the arteries until it reaches the target area. Once in place, an embolic fluid is injected through the catheter and into the targeted arteries. This fluid then works to block blood flow within the artery, which effectively cuts off the blood supply to the uterine fibroid being treated. This may be applied to as many fibroids as needed, and the blood then recirculates through other arteries in the pelvis.

LAPAROSCOPIC MYOMECTOMY

The laparoscope is a slender telescope that is inserted through the navel to view the pelvic and abdominal organs. Two or three small, half-inch incisions are made below the pubic hairline, and instruments are passed through these small incisions to perform the surgery. Next, a small scissors-like instrument is used to open the thin covering of the uterus. The fibroid is found underneath this covering, grasped, and freed from its attachments to the normal uterine muscle. After the fibroid is removed from the uterus, it must be brought out of abdominal cavity. The fibroid is cut into small pieces with a special instrument called a morcellator, and the pieces are removed through one of the small incisions. Most women are able to leave the hospital the same day as surgery. For more extensive surgery, a one-day stay may be required. Patients can usually walk on the day of surgery, drive in about a week and return to normal activity, work, and exercise within two weeks.

ROBOTIC-ASSISTED MYOMECTOMY

In this procedure, four standards, quarter-inch incisions are made and ports are inserted for the robot’s camera and instrument arms. The surgeon first injects medication into the fibroids to decrease overall bleeding and then makes an incision in the uterus. The surgeon then removes the fibroid(s) from the surrounding uterine tissue. Once the fibroid has been removed, the surgeon uses a special device called a morcellator to cut the fibroid into smaller pieces inside the patient’s abdomen. These pieces are then removed through one of the incisions ports. Patients typically go home the same day of the procedure and most patients are able to resume normal activities within two weeks.

ABDOMINAL MYOMECTOMY

In this operation, your surgeon enters the pelvic cavity through one or two incisions, depending on the size of the fibroid(s). A vertical incision is made from the middle of your abdomen, extends from just below your navel to just above your pubic bone. A vertical incision is recommended if your uterus has reached or exceeded the size comparable to if it were carrying a sixteen (16) week pregnancy. This incision might also be used if a fibroid is in a ligament between your uterus and pelvic wall. In other cases, a horizontal bikini-line incision is made that runs about an inch (about 2.5 centimeters) above your pubic bone. This incision follows your natural skin lines, so it usually results in a thinner scar and causes less pain than a vertical incision. Because it limits the surgeon’s access to your pelvic cavity, a bikini-line incision may not be appropriate if you have a large fibroid. Abdominal myomectomy usually requires a hospital stay of two to three days. Recovery takes four to six weeks.

VAGINAL HYSTERECTOMY

The uterus is removed through the vaginal opening. This procedure is most often used in cases of uterine prolapse, or when vaginal repairs are necessary for related conditions. During a vaginal hysterectomy, the surgeon detaches the uterus from the ovaries, fallopian tubes and upper vagina, as well as from the blood vessels and connective tissue that support it. The uterus is then removed through the vagina. However, if your uterus is enlarged, vaginal hysterectomy may not be possible.

LAPAROSCOPE-ASSISTED VAGINAL HYSTERECTOMY (LAVH)

Laparoscopically-assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) is a surgical procedure using a laparoscope (a thin, flexible tube containing a video camera) to guide the removal of the uterus and/or fallopian tubes and ovaries through the vagina (birth canal). During LAVH, several small incisions are made in the abdominal wall through which slender metal tubes are known as “trocars” are inserted to provide passage for a laparoscope and other microsurgical tools. Next, the uterus is detached from the ligaments that attach it to other structures in the pelvis using the laparoscopic tools. The fallopian tubes and ovaries are also detached from their ligaments and blood supply. The organs and tissue are then removed through an incision made in the vagina. LAVH typically requires a one to a three-day hospital stay. Complete recovery time is usually four weeks.

ROBOTIC-ASSISTED LAPAROSCOPIC HYSTERECTOMY

A robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy uses a computer to control the surgical instruments during the surgery. The surgeon controls the movements of the computer from a computer station in the operating room. At this point, three or four small incisions will be made near your belly button. Gas may be pumped into your belly to distend it to give your surgeon a better view and more room to work. The laparoscope is inserted into your abdomen; while other surgical instruments will be inserted through the other incisions. The surgeon will attach the laparoscope and the instruments to the robotic arms of the computer and then move to the control area to remotely control the surgery. Your uterus will be cut into small pieces that can be removed through the small incisions. Depending on the reasons for your hysterectomy, the whole uterus may be removed or just the part above the cervix. The fallopian tubes and ovaries attached to the uterus may also be removed. Most people stay in the hospital for a few days. Complete recovery may take anywhere from a few weeks to a few months.

ABDOMINAL HYSTERECTOMY

The uterus is removed through the abdomen via a surgical incision about six to eight inches long. The main surgical incision can be made either vertically, from the navel down to the pubic bone, or horizontally, along the top of the pubic hairline. After the incision has been made through the layers of skin, muscle, and other tissue, the physician will inspect the organs and other structures in the abdomen and pelvis. The tissues connecting the uterus to blood vessels and other structures in the pelvis will be carefully cut away. The uterus will be removed, along with any other structures such as the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and cervix, as required by your situation. Abdominal hysterectomy usually requires a hospital stay of one to two days, but it could be longer. The recovery period is usually about six to eight weeks.

Schedule an Appointment for Fibroid Treatment Today!

If you are experiencing pain or discomfort due to uterine fibroids contact the Kansas University Interventional Radiology to discuss treatment options with our specialists. Call (913) 588-1030 to schedule an appointment at our fibroid treatment center in Kansas City or Overland Park.

Request An Appointment

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